Sunday, 21 May 2017

Natural and Organic certifications to trust: NATRUE


All of this week I have been talking about Organic beauty and what certification means for brands and consumers. At a time when the natural beauty market is expanding more than ever, looking for certifications can help consumers buy with confidence knowing that brands have voluntary signed up to provide a certain quality and standard. I have talked a lot about the Soil Association stamp, especially as they organise Organic Beauty and Wellbeing week, but today I am turning my attention to the NATRUE seal and what it means.

NATRUE is based in Brussels and is an International non-profit organisation committed to promoting and protecting natural and organic standards worldwide. I have reiterated throughout this week that there is no legal standard or definition that brands need to abide by when using the terms natural and/or organic in their marketing, this leads to brands with differing standards and quality all being judged the same by well meaning consumers who think that by buying "organic" they are indeed buying the best on the market. This is something that has caused me a huge headache as a blogger too, because knowing which brands are genuine and which ones are simply paying lip service to things consumers want to hear is increasingly hard.

When I started my natural journey I was very grateful of brands who took the time to be certified, it made the shopping process infinitely easier to be able to check the logo on the packaging and is still something I look for now. The NATRUE symbol is found on over 5000 cosmetic products worldwide, a really significant achievement as NATRUE celebrates ten years in the industry. I was very impressed with the number of brands and products certified, it really goes to show that we as consumers have a vast amount of choice available to us. NATRUE cosmetics also cater very much to all price points making certified natural and organic cosmetics accessible to consumers.


If you want to shop NATRUE certified products in a store you simply have to look for the logo pictured above, a lot of stores selling natural products will have at least one NATRUE certified brand available and most will have many more to choose from. The logo indicates that the product will be certified by NATRUE and gives you as a consumer the following assurances:

There is a focus not just on the ingredients included in a product, but also the processes they have been subjected to. Synthetic ingredients are strictly prohibited, with the exception of nature identical ingredients such as mineral pigments where there is a safety concern or issue with purity and supply chain. For example in my recent review of the new Weleda lip balms I mentioned that the mining of mica was often associated with ethical issues such as child labour so in this case nature identical is preferable. NATRUE requires that a brand certifies a minimum of 75% of it's range, preferably more, stopping a brand certifying just one or two products in a range giving the illusion the entire range is certified.

There are three levels of certification that can be achieved with NATRUE:

Natural cosmetics - Some products will be more difficult than others to produce than others to an organic standard (for example a shampoo), so the natural certification is a good baseline. As stated previously there are limitations on nature identical ingredients permitted, with an uncertified brand there are no such standards and they often wouldn't even make the consumer aware they are used. Many brands will often include some organic ingredients, because they choose to do this wherever possible.

Natural cosmetics with Organic portion - As above. but 70% of the ingredients must also stem from organic or wild-crafted origin.

Organic Cosmetics - As above but the proportion of organic and wild-crafted ingredients must be 95% with further restrictions on the level of nature identical ingredients permitted.

As you can see NATRUE is a very thorough certification, but you can't tell simply from looking at the packaging which level of certification pertains to your product. If you are searching for a certified organic product for example, this is easy to do by searching the NATRUE database. You can further narrow down your search by category of product, brand and even country where it is available which I was very impressed by.



Some bands that have products certified by NATRUE that I recommend:

Weleda - It's no secret that I love Weleda and have done for many years, I use several of their products daily but it is often more. Weleda has it's whole range certified by NATRUE, which is fantastic but I also like that they cater for the whole family including babies. Both my kids have used predominantly Weleda products all their lives and we just love them here. I use many Weleda staples including their cult Skinfood moisturiser and their gorgeous perfumes.

Dr Hauschka - Another longstanding brand in the natural world with a great history behind it. Dr Hauschka has also relaunched their extensive make up collection recently with some gorgeous new packaging. I really love the body oils and cult Rose Day cream.

Lavera - Just like Weleda I have been using Lavera products for many years, they have a brilliant range of affordable basics called the Basis range and it has been one of my most repurchased over the years. The make up range that Lavera has is also very impressive, I have been testing a few products recently and really like the eye shadow quads for an easy every day look, more on Lavera Make up to come in another post.

Trilogy - A range hailing from New Zealand, Trilogy are well known for their inclusion of Rosehip in their skincare. One of my favourite Trilogy products is the Everything balm, a great all round product for face and body, wherever you need some moisture!

Also worth a mention are Santaverde and Ananne, two brands I have also used and loved. There are lot's more brands to explore with the NATRUE logo. For more information on the certification you can read my interview with the Brand Manager Francesca Morgante and Jayn Sterland of Weleda UK.  I hope that this post has helped to spread the word about NATRUE and the brilliant work that they do, let me know in the comments if you have any favourite products with this logo.

Ana x


Post contains PR samples please see my full disclaimer for details.
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4 comments

  1. Certification certification! Thanks for the reminder as for some reason NATRUE slips from my mind. Just had a quick look and many of the products I use are certified by them but I hadn't noticed the logo!

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    1. It is one that is less well known for some reason but a brilliant one to look for. Lovely to see you as usual the other day Xx

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  2. Very informative, thanks. Is there a stipulation that Natrue certified products can't be tested on animals? This was what Weleda told me when I asked them for clarification on their CF status. They gave me a thorough statement which seemed above board but I have a nagging doubt as to why certain US bloggers won't put them on the CF list (apparently because they sell toothpaste in China, which is supposed to be exempt).

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    1. Yes, on the NATRUE website there is a section that addresses animal testing and is not permitted at any stage for brands to keep their certification. Weleda is also featured in this years Compassionate shopping guide by NatureWatch, who produce a very thorough guide. I personally do not use Cruelty free blogs as an indicator of a brands cruelty free status, because of how rapidly things can change in terms of regulations I prefer to look to third party organisations like NatureWatch and Leaping Bunny. Having spoken to Weleda personally regarding their cruelty free status I am happy they are monitoring the situation in China closely and wouldn't compromise their values, they do have a presence but it is as far as I am aware only featuring items that are exempt from compulsory testing.

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